Archive for the ‘Puzzles’ Category

Puzzle #34 Brain Teaser: Where Ya’ Been? (Answer Included!)

February 19, 2010

Hello.  There was no puzzle posted last Friday, but I am able to post one today.  Why the week’s delay?  Solve the puzzle to find out.  Since I missed a week, I will include the answer today instead of Monday.  Also look in the answer section for a special announcement.  Happy Puzzling!

So, you can’t figure out what happened to me?  OK, click below for the answer. (more…)

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Answers to Puzzle #33: Wordplay: Poltergeists II: Theeeey’re Baaaack!

February 8, 2010

I hope you enjoyed the return of poltergeists!  If you didn’t try the puzzle yet you can find it here.  You can find the answers to this phantasmagoric puzzle below.  Also, two quick notes to wit:

1.  Friday’s puzzle was my 100th blog post.  Hurray!

2.  There is probably not going to be a post tomorrow due to a family matter.  Boooo!

And now, the answers: (more…)

Puzzle #33: Wordplay Poltergeists II: Theeeeey’re Baaaack!

February 5, 2010

This week we have another infestation of poltergeists!  Below is a list of seemingly random words, but each of them has extra letters in them.  If you remove these “ghost” letters, and read the remaining ones in order, you will get the name of a street in New York City.  The number of poltergeists in each word will appear in parenthesis next to said word.  For example. GRAY (1) would become GAY Street when the one poltergeist is removed.  As an added help, all the street names below are really streets in New York.  No Avenues, Boulevards, Roads, Ways, Alleys, Parkways, Highways, Lanes, Places, Terraces, Loops, Rows, or Concourses etc.  (Think Lower Manhattan and Outer Burroughs)  Happy Puzzling!

HAUNTED STREETS:

1.  BLANK (1)

2. CRANIAL (2)

3. GARLAND (2)

4.  ASPIRING (2)

5.  SWATTER (2)

6.  FAIREST (2)

7.  DURANTE (2)

8. BREADED (2)

9.  WAYBILL (3)

10.  MUNITION (3)

11.  GROWLED (3)

12.  MOSTEST (3)

Comings and Goings

February 3, 2010

Triviography Breakdown

Friday’s puzzle was a lot of fun for me, as the format of picking places in Manhattan allowed me to poke around the city both virtually and physically.  I both learned some new things and got to reminisce about places past.  Some of the pairs that I chose for the “which is further uptown puzzle/quiz” were done strictly for wordplay i.e. two Terminals, John Jay Park or College, but others were trips through time and space for me.  For instance, I went to college at Fordham University’s Lincoln Center Campus and still have a nostalgia for Lincoln Center and the surroundings.  Also, at one point of my life just about everyone who I was close to worked or lived on West 57th Street, so Carnegie Hall was a stones throw away.  I remember the GM Building for my early childhood as a place to stop near F.A.O Schwatz’s, and with the state of the American automotive industry, I thought putting it and the Chrysler building together in a puzzle was timely.

I also wanted to use two fictional addresses, and I had found one for Nero’s Wolfe’s brownstone, but I could not find any other landmarks for any other fictional New York private eyes!  That’s when the Fantastic Four’s HQ the Baxter Building jumped into my head, and fortunately when Stan Lee was creating his Marvel-verse he put things in locations he knew.  Avengers Mansion is pretty much the Frick Museum BTW.

As for Extra Virgin and Diablo Royale, the two restaurants I picked for the “West Fourth is further uptown than West Tenth” question, I must admit that I have never even set foot in either place (anyone know if either is any good?).  I just needed two restaurants and I liked the contrast of the names.  The whole West Fourth Street crossing West Tenth, Eleventh etc. is one of my favorite things to throw at newbies to the city.  Blows their mind every time, and it also gives the Village its reputation of difficulty in navigation.  This preserves what little charm the West Village has left.  Speaking of which:

Heinz Dept. – O. Henry’s and the Bar Was Called Jimmy Armstrong’s

In my musings post after Puzzle #30 I had asked for some help regarding two places that have disappeared from New York landscape, the Greenwich Village Eatery O Henry’s and a bar that a great friend of mine worked at (bloody well ran) on West 57th Street.  My sister found the location of O. Henry’s from a blog called New York Songlines, and according the site’s this virtual walking tour of West 4th Street, the location, 345 6th Avenue is now a bank.  Talk about the village losing its charm!  The bank in question is now a Capital One Bank and that is now directly across the street from a WaMu.  Sigh.  There is pretty much nothing else about the place on a google search.  I may have to, like go to a library or something for this one.  Shudder.

The bar who’s name I could not remember was Jimmy Armstrong’s.  This Clinton neighborhood joint had some tales to tell, but it too had the bad fortune to close in 2002 so precious little appears on the internet about it, but I did find a post mortem in the Times about it.

And so it goes.  New York is change isn’t it?  For those of us who desperately want to leave a mark in or on the world New York is a cruel place to live.  Beloved places vanish, majestic buildings crumble and as the people who made these places “places to be” pass on, the memories also recede.  What made O. Henry’s a long time village staple?  What made Jimmy Armstrong’s so inviting?  Mostly the people who ran the places and the people who came.  When they go, the rest of us get a bank or now a chain “pub” in the case of Armstrong’s.  In fact, right now in New York if the people who make a place special die or fall on hard times the chains are all too eager to gobble up them up and spit out a high-rise or a retail hell in their place.  I find this more than a little sad.  Which leads me to:

Brooklyn’s Loss is Seattle’s Gain

Scott M.X. Turner is one of those guys that makes something special.  He fought the Atlantic Yards Project, he hosted the Rocky Sullivan’s Pub Quiz, and he did great graphic design work for the fair people of Brooklyn (yours truly included, the Puzzling New York Blog’s logo and banner are his work).  Scott is unfortunately for us Brooklyn dwellers leaving us for the Emerald City.  I have only known Scott for a few months, but he has been more than generous to me with his time and energy.  He went to great lengths to focus my ideas for this blog’s look.  He allowed me to do many guest rounds at the pub quiz to promote my blog even though my following was nil, and he was a great “talk”.  Politics, sports, music, you name it he was sharp and game.  I will miss having him around, but Seattle won’t know what hit it.  If you want to catch Mr. Turner’s final go at quizmastering check him out tomorrow at 8:00 PM.  Need Info?  Sure thing.

Answers to Puzzle #32: Triviography I: The Bronx is Up and the Battery’s Down

February 1, 2010

If you did not try Friday’s geographical puzzle, fear not, for I have linked it here.  If you need the answers, click below. (more…)

Puzzle #32: Triviography I: The Bronx is Up and The Battery’s Down

January 29, 2010

This week’s puzzle is a combination of trivia and geography which I am dubbing Triviography! (See what I did there?)  This puzzle will give you a list of two different Manhattan landmarks and your challenge is to figure out which one of them is further uptown (i.e. north) on the Isle of Manhattan.  See how many you can do before you resort to Google Maps!  Happy Puzzling!

Which of these are further uptown?

1.  City Hall or The Town Hall

2.   The Metropolitan Museum of Art or The Museum of Natural History 

3.  Carnegie Hall or Lincoln Center

4.  Grand Central Terminal or The Port Authority Bus Terminal

5.  John Jay College or John Jay Park

6.  Chelsea Markets or Chelsea Piers 

7.  Avengers Mansion or The Baxter Building

8.  The Chrysler Building or The General Motors Building

9.  The Lake in Central Park or The Pond in Central Park

10.  The Cathedral of St. John the Devine or Columbia University

11.  259 West 4th Street or 189 West 10th Street

Answers to Puzzle#31: Word Jumble: Imperious Rex!

January 26, 2010

 Well that didn’t help.  If you tried Friday’s word jumble and solved it, you’ll know what I mean.  If you don’t know what I mean, well click below to see the answers and find out.

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Puzzle #31: Word Jumble: Imperious Rex!

January 22, 2010

This week’s puzzle is a Word Jumble.  You will find below six clues to six answers.  Fill in your answers to the clues in the blanks provided below.  When you’ve done that, take all of the letters that fall on a red blank, and rearrange them to spell out the two rallying cries that are the final answer to this puzzle.  I will include after each set of blanks, the number of words and total letters in parenthesis just in case this doesn’t translate well to your computer screen.  Happy Puzzling!  This one’s for you Dad.

CLUES:

1. Planes do this on a runway or Jets do this in an end zone.

2.  Priority one in an airport or two points.

3.  Old NYC set soap or a head coach’s desire.

4.  He or she hurts rushing in an airport or he helps rushing on the football field.

5.  Nickname for legendary QB or a Theatre District cup of coffee?

6.  _______ pattern or _______ penalty.

ANSWERS:

1.  ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ (1 word, 9 letters)

2. ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ (1 word, 6 letters)

3.  ___ ___ ___ ___‘ ___     ___ ___ ___ ___

(2 words, 9 letters)

4.  ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ (1 word, 5 letters)

5.  ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___     ___ ___ ___

(2 words, 11 letters)

6.  ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___  (1 word, 7 letters)

FINAL ANSWER:

___ ___     ___ ___ ___ ___!

___ ___ ___ ___     ___ ___ ___ ___!

(4 words, 14 letters)

Answers to Puzzle #30 Wordplay: Gone but Not Frgttn

January 18, 2010

If you tried Friday’s puzzle and could not come up with the answer for number 2 on the list, it is because I really blew it.  The lost NYC fixture that was the answer for number 2 was incorrectly done, spectacularly incorrect in fact.  The puzzle was to figure out the names of famous New York institutions that are no longer with us, in which I removed the vowels from each said institution.  Well, for number two I completely brain farted and removed all of the consonants.  IAAI!!!!!!!!  I was enamored with my own cleverness of providing nothing but an apostrophe for a clue, and failed to realize that I had COMPLETELY REVERSED THE PREMISE OF THE PUZZLE.  Sigh.  No matter, like the ancient Persian rug maker, I shall incorporate my mistake into my puzzling tapestry in the form of a bonus puzzle.  To wit:  Can you figure out the New York City iconic place that recently disappeared where if you removed all the consonants you would be left with a sole apostrophe?  The answer for this will appear tomorrow.  The answers for the eleven solvable puzzles can be found by clicking below.

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On Pyramids and Plans

January 13, 2010

Yer Outta Here!

Once again I enjoyed creating the word pyramid, and this time I got to combine two things that I love, namely puzzling and sports.  I didn’t think that the next word pyramid that I would do would be sports themed, but when I went through the list of starting letters that I hadn’t used yet the letter “K” just screamed strikeout to me.  I am fully prepared to admit that I am that geek at the ballpark who scores the game as it goes.  I only do this for baseball, as the action is slow enough to keep score and still converse with my friends in attendance.  And yes I know that keeping score is utterly unnecessary with the modern scoreboard, the iPhone, and the internet, but there is still an allure to the ol’ Luddite part of me of pen (pencil if less brave) and paper to record the game. 

As for the pyramid, I wanted to involve as many sports as possible, so to go from K to KO as a natural.  I did some quick internet research on great fights in New York’s past, and was hard pressed to top Louis/Schmeling II.  After the first two answers I ran into a tone of dead ends for subsequent ones.  It wasn’t until I changed the last answer from STRIKE OUT to A STRIKE OUT that things came together for me.  Having the extra vowel to work with freed me up and it went very well from there. 

BTW: A STRIKE OUT uses all vowels only once.  I love finding words and phrases that accomplish that, but alas, this time the five vowels are just a happy accident. 

The one clue that I was not happy with was for the answer TAKES OT, as in the game is going into overtime.  The clue I settled on: “What the basketball game needs when St. John’s ends the second half 68-68. (1 word, 1 abbrev.)” just never flowed nicely enough for me.  I struggled for a clue that would make the puzzle solver think in the present tense to get the “S” in TAKES, but the present tense in the clue never seemed to convey the word TAKES.  I wish I had found a more elegant solution for this clue, but I could not and if you didn’t get that one, I’ll take the blame for it.

Upcoming Puzzling

I have some ideas for Puzzling New York City that will be coming out in the new year.  Some are quite ambitious, and I am not sure when they will occur.  Fingers crossed and noses to grind stone y’all.  I will have announcements if and when any are warrented.

I also want to explore other traditional forms of word puzzling in the coming months and I am working on anagrams, acrostics, and something so unique that I haven’t come up with a name for it yet.  I want to increase the variety found here at Puzzling New York City, but I am sailing out of the bay and into open water, so this may take a little time.  I approach the coming year with high hopes, and great enthusiasm!  Woo hoo!  As well as some dread, and “real world” issues… sigh.  Ain’t that life?  Be back Friday with another puzzle.